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Posts Tagged ‘fire’

Cold Springs Fire: Two Weeks Later

26 Jul

Click on photos for larger versions.

This evening I went back to one of the view points I had of the fire a little over 2 weeks ago. I took some “after” photos for a comparison.

Little did I know at the time when I took this first photo, that there was a house in the upper right. All that stands now is a chimney and some solar panels.

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The following two photos are also aligned. The houses in these photos appear to have escaped major damage.

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The next three photos show what had to have been some remarkable structure protection efforts by the fire fighters.

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I’m not sure if the house in this final photo escaped damage.  From this angle it looks okay.

 

Cold Springs Fire

10 Jul

Photos from Day 2 of the Cold Springs Fire (click on photo for larger).

 

Chinook dipping into Barker Reservoir.

Chinook dipping into Barker Reservoir.

 

Chinook dropping a load.

Chinook dropping a load.

 

Black Hawk

Black Hawk

 

North side of Boulder Canyon

North side of Boulder Canyon

 

North Side of Boulder Canyon.

North Side of Boulder Canyon.

 

Chinook Helicopter

Chinook Helicopter

 

There is a house right in the center.

There is a house near the bottom of the stream of water.  When the flame showed up in the lower right, I got out of there.

 

Lockheed P2V Neptune

Lockheed P2V Neptune

 

 

This one is a jet.

This one is a jet (BAE 146).

 

 

 

 
 

Logging

25 Jun

I visited the West Mag area on my bike to view the results of the year-long logging project there.

Overall, I’m not unhappy with what has been done.  What makes me unhappy is all of the lies and bullshit justification for the project to begin with.  A lot of it were claims about pine beetles.  What’s left is worse than what pine beetles could have ever done.  Yeah, if you take away the forest, you won’t have a pine beetle problem.  That’s like tearing out a lawn because it has some weeds in it.  Don’t even get me started on fire mitigation.  The area is just a flammable in 40 MPH winds as it ever was.

Seventy percent of the trees removed here were alive and healthy.  Granted, the forest was mature and dense due to lack of fires.

A big question I have is, since the land is publicly owned by us, why can’t some of the wood be used by the public?  A huge number of homes here in the mountains are heated by wood.  Everything the government does benefits a private contractor.

 

Looking towards The Divide from forest road 355. (click for much larger.)

Looking towards The Divide from forest road 355. (click for much larger, then click again and use the scroll bar.)

 

I know this area really well. The landscape is now unfamiliar where the trees have been removed.  The points of reference my brain had are now gone.  Even though the road in the above photo is the exact same road that I’ve traveled a hundred times, it seemed I’d had never been on it before.  Every once in a while, I’d catch something familiar to connect then and now.

 

Large slash piles waiting to be burned.

Large slash piles waiting to be burned.

 

I’m sure that sooner or later, someone is going to come along and torch one of these piles.  They are sitting there like bonfires in the waiting.  From what I’ve read, there is no plan yet in place to do anything with them.

It will be interesting to see how long it takes for some vegetation to re-grow in the cut areas.  While there is a little grass in the foreground of the photo above, most places are totally void of any living plant.

The project isn’t finished yet.  It will gradually move southward into Gilpin County.

 

 
 
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